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US: Support for Latin American dictators



Commenting on an account by John Heelan on US support for Laton American dictators, Tim Brown said:

"It's nice to have someone put together all the major largely unsubstantiated canards of the left in one place. Other than having most of the historical facts wrong, it was Standard not United Fruit that first was active in Honduras" John Heelan retorts: "Tim is pedantically correct in stating that'it was Standard Fruit, not United Fruit, that was first active in Honduras' but only by a margin of 8 years: "In 1899 the first banana concession was granted to the Vacarro brothers; their company would later become Standard Fruit. In 1907 Sam Zemurray set up the Cuyamel Fruit Company; later bought by United Fruit. The unequal relationship that would exist between the companies and the Honduran state for the first half of the 20th century gave rise to the description "banana republic." Between 1932 and 1948 Honduras was ruled by a dictator, Tiburcio Carias Andino". (Source: http://www.avilacigars.com/honduras.html)

"Honduras is one of the poorest nations in the Western Hemisphere and remains dependent on U.S. aid. The economy is based on agriculture; bananas and coffee are the most important exports. The vast banana plantations, established by U.S. companies, are mainly along the northern coast; the United Fruit Company and the Standard Fruit Company, fiercely resented by many as exploitative monopolies, have had much social and political influence in Honduras".

Presumably Tim would dismiss the following US interventions as 'cute collection of propaganda jibes"?

*History of U.S. Interventions in Latin America*
Location, Period, Type of Force, Comments on U.S. Role

Sources:

Blum, William. Killing Hope: U.S. Military and CIA Interventionism Since World War II. Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 1995.

Ege & Makhijani. "180 Landings by the U.S. Marine Corps" (History Division), Counterspy (July-Aug. 1982). Foreign Affairs Division, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress.

Instances of Use of Armed Forces Abroad, 1798-1945. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975, revision of 1969 version.

Grossman, Zoltan. Over a Century of U.S. Military Interventions. Self-published, revised Jan. 1, 1995.

Sklar, Holly. "Who's Who: Invading 'Our' Hemisphere 1831-," Z Magazine (Feb. 1990).

U.S. Congress, Committee on Foreign Affairs' Report. Background Information on the Use of United States Armed Forces in Foreign Countries. Washington, D.C.: 91st Congress, 2nd Session, 1970.

Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States. New York: Perennial Library, Harper & Row, 1980.

(Source: http://www2.truman.edu/~marc/resources/interventions.html)

Ronald Hilton - 8/7/03


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