Russia's "Preemptive Policy" Declaration




Jon Kofas writes: AP, the BBC, and other news organizations have announced that Russia will not hesitate to adopt a preemptive strike policy against "terrorist" enemies outside of its sovereign border. There were even hints of the use of nuclear weapons, though three Kremlin analysts explained to various news organizations that did not mean imminent strike, the use of such weapons, or that Russia was interested in following the steps of Bush by occupying foreign countries. They did state, however, that in the name of national security, the option of preemptive strike was there for them as it is for Washington. None of these analysts mentioned that Russian troops have killed over 100,000 people in Chechnya and they have made the lives of this minority Muslim community in the mountains a living hell for 150 years, a living hell to which there is no end, other than a political solution. Kremlin hyperbole about striking back hard notwithstanding, this issue is so emotional that people only see their side of the issue. In a polycentric world order with the U.S. as the undisputed Hyperpower that has resolved to determine the global balance of power by using "terrorism" as a pretext, Russia is now adopting the same policy. This means that China must follow the same policy or form an alliance with France and Germany to counterpoise the U.S. and now Russia, for Beijing cannot permit the Kremlin and D.C. to be the sole mega-players in determining the world balance of power. China too has Muslims who have not exactly been well treated by the state. The toothpaste is out of the tube and there is a new kind of war for global hegemony.


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Ronald Hilton 2004

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last updated: October 8, 2004